Managing Resources

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Eight Pieces of Information to Provide When Assigning Work

One of the basic responsibilities of the project manager is to assign work to team members. However, some project managers are not always clear on the work to be done and the person that is responsible. This causes uncertainty in the team and can result in some activities running late.

In fact, if you have managed projects for a while, you have probably run into this situation. For example, you might ask a team member the status of a critical assignment and they may tell you that they did not realize that they were assigned to the activity.

A good way to test whether your directions and assignments are clear is to ask team members what they are responsible for completing in the next two weeks. This is not something you need to do with every team member every week. However, it can be valuable to ask once in a while, or when a critical activity is due, just to validate whether you are assigning activities clearly. If the team members know what is expected of them, chances are that you are effectively and clearly assigning the work. However, if team members give you different answers than you expect, it may mean that you need to work on being clearer and more precise.

When you assign work to team members, be clear about the following eight items:

Activity name. This comes from the schedule.

An explanation. Describe the work if necessary.

Start-date and end-date. The project manager needs to be clear on when the activity can start (probably immediately) and when the activity is due. If the team member cannot meet the deadline date, he needs to let the project manager know as soon as possible.

Estimated effort hours (optional). The project manager should communicate the estimated hours required to complete the activity. This is usually of secondary importance compared to the due date – unless the customer is getting charged for each hour worked. If the team member cannot complete the activities within the estimated effort hours, he needs to let the project manager know as soon as possible.

Estimated costs (optional). If the team member cannot complete the work within the cost estimate, he needs to let the project manager know as soon as possible. If the activity only includes labor, the cost overrun will be directly related to an overage in labor hours. However, if there are non-labor charges involved in the activity, it is possible that these non-labor costs could be over budget.

Deliverable. The team member needs to understand the deliverable or work component (a portion of a larger deliverable) that he is expected to complete. If there are quality criteria to meet, the team member should know these quality requirements.

Dependencies. Make sure the team member knows his relationship with other activities – ones that are waiting on him or ones that must be completed before his can start.

Other resources. Communicate if there are other people or resources working on the same activities. The team member must understand if there are other staff members and who has overall responsibility for the activity.

If team members understand the work perfectly but don’t deliver on time, you may have a performance problem. However, if the team member is not clear about the work they have been assigned or the due date, the project manager may have a communication problem.

Understand These Three Estimating Concepts

Posted from method123.com

Estimate in Phases

One of the most difficult aspects of planning projects is the estimating process. It can be hard to know exactly what work will be needed in the distant future. It can be difficult to define and estimate work that will be done three months from now. It’s harder to estimate six months in the future. Nine months is even harder. There is more and more estimating uncertainty associated with work that is farther and farther out in the future.

A good approach for larger projects is to break the work into a series of smaller projects, each of which can be planned, estimated and managed separately with a much higher likelihood of success. From an estimating perspective, the closest project can be estimated more precisely, with the subsequent projects estimated with a higher level of uncertainty. When one project completes, the next project can be estimated with a higher degree of confidence, with estimates refined for the remaining projects. This technique also provides checkpoints at the end of each project so that the entire initiative can be revalidated based on current estimates to ensure that it is still viable and worth continuing.

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5 Ways to Avoid Scope Creep

May 1, 2013

A project manager was working on a small, three-month project to deliver a new piece of software. After a couple of weeks, the project sponsor decided to add some new requirements. The project manager included them. A bit later on, the sponsor made some more changes, and asked for some new functionality. Again, the project manager said that it was no problem. The changes were made. Towards the end of the three months, the sponsor went to the project manager and complained that the project was behind schedule. The project manager tried to explain that all the changes meant that there was no way that the software could be completed to the original timescales. The sponsor was not happy and the project manager was taken off that project because he was “too slow”.

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Three roles of the Project Management Office

Posted on March 10, 2011 by Alvin

When someone says PMO most people think of a team of Project Managers, or some say Project Manglers, and a long list of procedures they need to follow. I would say this would have been true in the past, but these days the expectations of the PMO has shifted and can vary greatly from company to company. First off is the name, you have some that think it should be called a Program Management Office while others like to call it a Portfolio Management Office or even Enterprise Portfolio Management Office. I prefer Project Management Office as you are dealing with projects regardless of the number. Another name that I think works well would be a Project Portfolio Management Office. Whatever the name, they all basically try to do the same thing. Below is a diagram I drew of three roles of the PMO I plan to cover.

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How to manage your manager

By : Jennifer Whitt, Director of ProjectManager.com

It’s one of my most favorite topics, one of my biggest lesson learned. So, we’ve all been there, right? On our project, where we have the manager always hovering over us checking in, checking in, checking in, or that one who you can’t find them when you need them the most.

Well, I remember a story back when I first started working corporate America, and I had one of those managers who were always coming in every five minutes. So the work area that we were in, everyone in the office area, the manager would have to come by the secretary’s office, so we had secretaries in those days.

We had the secretary notify us by phone, by an intercom with the code word of “Duck on the pond”. “Duck on the pond” meant duck and run because here comes the manager, so we would all duck and run. So instead of using the duck and run and the code, I’m going to offer you six tips to manage up effectively.

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