March, 2013

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5 Main Responsibilities of a Project Manager

Dinner at a fine restaurant is always an assortment of dishes. Small portions of appetizers, soups and salads whet the palate and subdue the appetite so that a diner enjoys the real star of the show, the main course. Dessert completes the experience. Likewise, while project management entails many small activities, there are a handful of main responsibilities that successful project managers serve up.

The following are the:

5 Main Responsibilities of a Project Manager

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Four Benefits of Project Management Training

Thanks to method123 for content

Would you go to a doctor who took their last training course in 1986? Of course not! Training is absolutely essential to stay current with the latest diagnoses, treatments, and technologies that cure sickness and disease. Likewise, it is essential for the project management professional – whether in-person or e-classes. It’s just as important for you to keep up on new methodologies, techniques and technologies that increase your ability to deliver a project on time and on budget.
Four Benefits of Project Management Training

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Government IT projects are prone to failure for 6 very predictable reasons

Published in HBR - by Rita McGrath | 1:29 PM October 10, 2008

In the course of doing research for our forthcoming book, “Discovery Driven Growth: A Breakthrough Process to Reduce Risk and Seize Opportunity,” we have spent a lot of time researching disappointments, redirections, and outright flops. Many of these involve IT in some substantive way.

I was recently asked by reporter to comment on why IT projects, particularly government-sponsored IT projects, are so prone to failure, and it got me to thinking about the lessons we’ve learned from other kinds of failures. With today’s headlines screaming about how government is taking a much larger role in our economy — and by extension in our lives — I thought it would be helpful to consider what we know about why governmental projects tend to flop and what we might want to consider doing about it. Many of these lessons are equally applicable to IT flops of other kinds, but since almost every major program involves a technological component, they are particularly of concern for the guys who are now going to have billions of dollars to spend pretty much as they see fit.

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Four Ways to Judge Project Success

Success

Ah, the ubiquitous triple constraint of project management. Every project must be on time, within budget, in scope – and meet quality standards. Adjust one element of the triple constraint and the other elements must shift accordingly. Unfortunately, meeting the triple constraint is often the only measure of project success, when other factors should be considered. These additional success factors should be listed in the Project Charter or other initiation documents. To verify that your project truly has been successful, here are:

Four Ways to Judge a Project Success

Projects that nail the triple constraint are not necessarily a success. Conversely, projects may be deemed successful without satisfying the triple constraint. Ask yourself the following four questions to determine whether or not your project can rightly be judged a success.

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